A Poem Meant for You, Our Dear Lottie’s Kitchen Supporters

pr mental illness flower MB900445658Thank You, Lottie’s Kitchen

 

 

 

 

In Hadassah’s outpatient clinic, I sit near my wife on a chair,

Along with many patients who’ve come from far and near.

Each one is hooked up to IV, getting chemo to cure his disease

Perhaps the powerful drugs will alleviate and ease.

As I sit there, my stomach rumbling, I wonder – what will be???

As an escort, I get no hospital meal, and I’m ravenously hungry…

Just then, in walk some women, their bags bulging and cheery

With food in all shapes and size – pareve, meat, and dairy.

For those who want something lighter, there’s a fresh and luscious roll.

I choose the tray of pareve food – it revives me, body and soul!

I thought of the chessed you do with love that’s sincere and real.

Thank you, Ezer Mizion, for the tasty and heartwarming meal!

Yoram E.

 

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Building the Spirit with Lego Bricks

pr canc sup mini cooper IMG-20151221-WA0008Alon was 21 when he completed his combat duty and was looking forward to beginning civilian life. But it was not to be. He thought he had the flu. A few days in bed… He waited for it to disappear but it just didn’t go away. Then came the diagnosis. Cancer.
It was a cancer that affects kids only. Because of his condition and the treatment required, he was hospitalized at Dana Children’s Hospital, the pediatric hospital of the renowned Ichilov Medical Center in Tel Aviv.
And so there he was in need of as much support as possible but surrounded by children’s activities. He understood intellectually that the most important issue is to get well but longed for some emotional support along the way. A steady stream of arts and crafts counselors, clowns, entertainers, puppet shows, game room counselors, etc. made its way to his door. This was not what he needed. Besides for not feeling well, Alon felt very out of place. Continue reading Building the Spirit with Lego Bricks

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Ezer Mizion Elad Troops in Action

pr phoneEzer Mizion, the Caller ID reads.
“Are you available to drive a patient to the hospital today at four?” Eli’s forehead wrinkles in thought and he makes the calculations. “I’ll take it.”
His cell phone vibrates. “This is Dr. Kluger’s secretary,” You have an appointment in another two weeks but a slot became available today at four. Interested?”
Yes, very interested. His foot has been waiting for over a month to be seen by the overbooked, expert orthopedist. True, it’s nothing critical but the nagging pain… Perhaps he should cancel the volunteer trip? Just this once…
“No,” he heard himself say. “I’m booked this afternoon.”
A soldier in the Ezer Mizion army does not go AWOL. Continue reading Ezer Mizion Elad Troops in Action

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Like Water

pr mental illness flowers 1542_ne_photo_stories1_98b2aWe are currently visiting and had to take our daughter to out- patients last evening. It was traumatic and Boruch HASHEM all was okay. Ezer Mezion was there with a coffee trolley and biscuits and kindness. I would liken Ezer Mizion to water. It seeps into every corner. So do the activities Ezer Mizion. Its chessed seeps into every corner of people’s lives.
Thank you and please convey our thanks to the hanholla. You have no idea what that chessed means. May you all have koach (strength) to carry out this wonderful avoida (service).
Sincerely,
A visiting family from South Africa

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Behind the Wheel at Ezer Mizion

pr amb Shmuel Strauss interviewShmuel Strauss was hired as a driver. His job: to transport the elderly and disabled from here to there. But reading between the lines, he knew that an Ezer Mizion driver could do so much more.
“I often see the same people week after week and develop relationships,” he says. “One of my clients was a young mother of three whose husband had died four years ago. Now it was she who was battling for her life. I take her to the oncology clinic for treatment several times a week. Worries color her every waking hour. Will she…? What will be with her children afterwards…” Shmuel would speak warmly to her. His encouragement left her smiling, albeit wanly. One trip found her even more depressed than usual. Continue reading Behind the Wheel at Ezer Mizion

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Alternative Medicine by Kobi Arielli

Interview with
Dano Monkotowich, Jerusalem Branch Coordinator

pr general hand heartFrom Dano I learned a new definition for the term “alternative medicine.”
“Patients and their families appreciate what our work does only after we are not on the scene anymore. A worried family member sits next to his loved one’s room in the hospital chewing at his nails or hunting for an outlet where he can charge his cell phone. He’s nervous, concerned, frightened.
Suddenly an Ezer Mizion volunteer passes by with his refreshments cart and offers him a Danish pastry. The fellow thanks him with a blank expression, opens the wrapper, and eats the cake. The volunteer has already continued on his way. He is already on the next floor, in a different ward. Meanwhile, downstairs, the person pulls off half of the pastry and gives it to his sick relative. They finish munching, flick away the crumbs, and suddenly grasp what ‘alternative medicine’ is.”
Dano is right. It’s not the Danish. It’s the secret ingredient. The compassionate smile. The pat on the shoulder. The sympathetic words of encouragement. It’s the giver, even more than what is given. You are sitting there in the oncology ward at your low point. You have forgotten that you didn’t put a thing in your mouth the entire day. It is not even ‘alternative medicine’. It is medicine itself and without the pain that often comes with medical treatment. Plain and simple. Both the patient and the family member feel so much better. Someone noticed them as a person- not a vein to jab or a form to fill out. Someone understands what they are going through. Someone cares. pr LK 2013
Every day, Ezer Mizion’s Lottie’s Kitchen volunteers walk through hospital wards on regular routes at set hours and distribute their alternative medicine- pastries, hot meals, sandwiches, and drinks- to patients and their families. The ‘treatment’ affects not only the patient and family member but also the Lottie’s Kitchen volunteer. “It feels good to give,” they all say once they have tasted the experience.
“A few years ago,” Dano says, “we launched a project to recruit volunteers, with an interesting theme: Couples. The couples, usually parents of children, took upon themselves one or more volunteer rounds a week. They walk or drive to the hospital, load the meals onto the wagon, and go through the wards to distribute them. What were the results? Patients and their families whose pain was lessened, a greatly strengthened volunteer network, and, as a bonus: greatly enhanced matrimony. There is something about this joint work of doing chessed for others that does wonders for their marriage. I am willing to wager that on their way home, the couple has already forgotten all about the fights they had that afternoon and the entire week before.”
You know what I found most interesting in this whole story? Think about it. When someone you know has to be in the hospital, chas v’shalom and suddenly an energetic young man or woman sporting an Ezer Mizion shirt comes over and offers you a sandwich, does it seem strange to you? Unexpected? No, not at all. You know why? Because Ezer Mizion has become synonymous with giving. We have grown accustomed to it. And as far as I’m concerned, this pleasant routine, this naturalness with which we accept the Ezer Mizion giving– that is the biggest story of all. pr general hand heart

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Back to Routine?

Fall Leaf Images Clip Art Three-fall-leaves-cl..Summer is over and Yom Tov has come to an end. It’s back to the routine. Lost homework, missed busses and all the rest. For most people.

As we wait outside in the rain with a shivering first grader who refuses to wear her raincoat, a neighbor looks on in envy. She would also like to be back to routine but her first grader is lying on a hospital bed in the oncology ward. She has her own routine: chemotherapy treatments, tests, pain, and anxiety.

It’s so hard. The endless, complex red tape, the demands of the other children who cannot understand why Mommy is hardly home, the regular household needs, the emotional needs of her precious child lying so pale and wan—it’s all so overwhelming. And then there’s the fear- the terror that engulfs, the horror that crushes, the monster that you don’t want to face but it faces you and you are forced to look into its ghastly eyes, helpless. Continue reading Back to Routine?

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On the Road to Life

ambulance IMG_2569Ezer Mizion’s eighteen ambulances and vehicles for transport of the disabled cruise Israel’s roads and highways almost twenty-four hours a day, providing service to as many patients and mobility-impaired as possible. For each of the passengers, this service is as indispensable as the air they breathe. Most of them are oncology or dialysis out-patients who must come to the hospital a few times a week for treatment. Some are transported by car by our thousands of volunteer drivers. For others, their physical condition precludes travel by car, even with assistance. Yet, for these patients, frequent hospital trips are essential to life. Travel via ambulance is the only option but ambulance transport is not covered by Kupat Cholim. The cost of one trip by private ambulance begins at about NIS 400. Continue reading On the Road to Life

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An Email that Belongs to You, Our Dear Friends and Supporters

—— ‏הודעה מקורית——

‏מאתpr mental illness flower MB900445658:

‏תאריך: יום ב׳, 7 בספט’ 2015 20:51

‏אל:;

‏נושא:thank you

Shalom,
I have been so blessed by the dear ladies of Ezer Mizion who come to Hadassah ER.

The coffee, cakes, meals have been so helpful to me and sooo many others, and the ladies themselves are the most special of all.
Toda raba, and Shana tova!  🙂

Michele.

 

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A Glimpse at the Volunteer Division Files

pr fileName: Doriel Feig (18)

Personal Status: Single

Residence: Kefar Ganim Gimmel, Petach Tikvah

Occupation: High school student, Ulpanat Yeshurun

Congregation: Moriah

Volunteering areas: Volunteers at Oranit, Ezer Mizion’s Guest Home for cancer patients undergoing treatments at nearby hospitals (and their families).

As part of a group of volunteer youth, Doriel also goes to the Pediatric Oncology Ward at Schneider to play with the patients, cheer them up, laugh, roughhouse with them, and otherwise dispel their boredom and pain.

Insights: The volunteering and the personal connection made with the patients and their families is tremendously fulfilling. Each child, each family, steps into your heart and becomes an inseparable part of your personal life. The volunteering offers opportunities for tremendous joy, like when you manage to get a smile or a good laugh from one of the patients. The distinction between what is important and what is trivial in life becomes so clear. It develops your gratitude to Hashem for what he gave you, for your physical and emotional health. The suffering that is seen there breaks down all your defensive barriers of apathy and forces you to be sensitive to those around you, to stretch out a helping hand, to give a warm hug, and to experience a feeling of genuine caring towards every person who needs it.”

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